The remaining independent press is largely confined to two weeklies, the Standard and the Zimbabwe Independent. Another weekly, The Zimbabwean, is produced in London and distributed in Zimbabwe as an international publication.

Because of rampant inflation, cover prices have spiralled and are beyond the reach of many Zimbabweans. Publishers have been hit by escalating printing and newsprint costs.
A range of draconian laws and institutions, along with prison sentences for “publishing false news”, are used to clamp down on critical comment. Journalists who fail to register with a government body risk imprisonment.

State-run Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation (ZBC) operates the country’s only TV and radio stations. ZBC formerly had two TV channels; its second network was leased to private station Joy TV which closed in 2002. Some of its programmes were said to have ruffled government feathers.

Surveillance, threats, imprisonment, censorship, blackmail, abuse of power and denial of justice are all brought to bear to keep firm control over the news

Reporters Without Borders, 2007

Radio is the main source of information for many Zimbabweans. Although there are no private stations, the country is targeted by overseas-based oparartion.

In recent news the Political Editor of the herald has been described as a power hungry attention seeker, a political turncoat, a polished pretender and a mercenary who was bootlicking Mugabe and defending ZANU PF for the money and material benefits that come with such political adultery. Zvayi now boasts of a senior post in the state run newspaper, a company car, a government rented flat in central Harare, a farm and several other material benefits.



Source by Laura Andeson

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here